Journal

18.05.2017 • King's Cross , Spectacle Craft , Design

Spectacle making.

Last week we held our first spectacle making workshops, as part of London Craft Week.

The workshops gave an introduction to the craftsmanship that goes into designing and hand making a pair of spectacles, using traditional methods from plotting facial measurements on paper to hand sawing and filing their frame. 

Thank you to all the wonderful budding spectacle makers who participated.

We'll be holding our next series of spectacle workshops in August 2017.

To express an interest, please email info@cubitts.co.uk with the subject line 'Spectacle Making Workshops'.

11.05.2017 • Cubitts , Spectacle Design , Spectales , Design

INTRODUCING OUR NEW FRAME, CROMER.

Continuing our reinterpretation of silhouettes from mid century France, Cromer has a sharp faceted brow, and oversized keyhole bridge.

Cromer comes in 9 glorious colours. 

Cromer takes it name from Cromer Street in southern King's Cross. 

Originally the land was a small 'public-house, tea-house and skittle ground', known as the Golden Boot. Later renamed to the Boot Tavern, it was the headquarters of the Gordon rioters and later was mentioned in Charles Dickens' book, Barnaby Rudge.

It the 1840s, during the pomp of the Cubitt brothers in the adjoining Gray's Inn Road, Cromer Street was occupied by a class of 'small tradesmen and artisan lodgers' in densely crowded lodgings. 

It was previously called Lucas Street, after Joseph Lucas, variously described as 'a tin-man and tin-plate worker, of Long Acre, Covent Garden'.

For more information see here and here.

INTRODUCING OUR NEW FRAME, CROMER. INTRODUCING OUR NEW FRAME, CROMER. INTRODUCING OUR NEW FRAME, CROMER. INTRODUCING OUR NEW FRAME, CROMER.
27.04.2017 • Design

Objects by | Charles Wu

Objects by.

A series of eight short stories about objects at Cubitts and the makers behind them. Captured by George Baxter.

The Mug. By Charles Wu.

In need of mugs for our patients to imbibe, we commissioned Charles Wu of Polysmiths - architect, ceramicist and one of our first ever customers way back in 2013.

Each mug is meticulously glazed at Charles’ studio in Dalston to reflect the colour and patina of each store.

 

 

13.04.2017 • Cubitts , Sunglasses

Cubitts x Sunspel

Our first sunglasses collaboration with fellow British brand, Sunspel. 

Available in five styles across three silhouettes, each frame has been named after a building that has played an important part in Sunspel’s manufacturing history.

Our Cubitts x Sunspel campaign features the quintuplet of sunglasses against a summertime palette, shot by Gary Didsbury.

See the collection here.

Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel Cubitts x Sunspel
06.04.2017 • Cubitts , Sunglasses , Accessories , Design

NEW CLIP ONS

Turning your spectacles into sunglasses, like water into wine.

The perfect Spring accoutrement to Ampton, Bingfield, Cartwright, Crestfield, Herbrand and Gifford spectacles.

Each clip features a delicate filiegree detail, and hooks onto the frame with an elegant loop construction.

Available in Silver or Gold.

All clip ons come fitted with UV400 Zeiss lenses, in grey, green or brown.

NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS NEW CLIP ONS
30.03.2017 • Photography

WE TOOK SOME PHOTOS

Shot on location earlier this year around King's Cross, from Granary Square where the granary store built by Lewis Cubitt still stands (now Central Saint Martins) to Percy Circus; the place Lenin briefly called home.

Featuring some of our latest frame releases and time-honoured classics.  

Photographer - Jake at Wild Studio. 

www.wildstudio.co.uk

WE TOOK SOME PHOTOS WE TOOK SOME PHOTOS WE TOOK SOME PHOTOS WE TOOK SOME PHOTOS
23.03.2017 • Design

Introducing Cubitts Chess

To mark our inaugural participation in London Craft Week in May, we thought we'd try something new. 

The result: Cubitts chess.

Using our signature butterfly rivet, the pieces tessellate to form one complete profile. Made from ash and walnut, with a rivet of ebony, the board is finished with a rather delectable brass trim.

On display - and ready for challenges - at our HQ in King's Cross.

Introducing Cubitts Chess Introducing Cubitts Chess Introducing Cubitts Chess Introducing Cubitts Chess
16.03.2017 • Spectacle Design

Introducing our new frame, Wilmington.

Referencing silhouettes from 1940s France, Wilmington features a glorious brow, chamfered by hand to catch the light. We think she's rather sublime. 

With a saddle bridge and hockey end temples, Wilmington is available in 8 colours, with an optional custom matte finish, as well as optional stainless steel nosepads (for those with a loser crest height).

Wilmington is named after the equally striking Wilmington Square, in southern St Pancras and along the northern fringes of Clerkenwell. This was once the site of Spa Fields, which gained popularity after the Napoleonic Wars as a site of great assemblies in support of universal suffrage.

The first residents of Wilmington Square in the late 1820s initially included many watchmakers, including Thomas Masssey, Samuel Cuendet, and Richard Wilmton - soon followed by jewellers, barometer makers and mathematical instrument markers. Most residents lived and worked in the same sites, with gardens teeming with workshops and apprentices.

The Square's garden was built in 1819, and described so marvellously by architect G. L. Morris:

"On Saturdays the broad asphalt paths teem with children from the dwellings of the surrounding neighbourhood, boys and girls of all sorts, sizes, and conditions, barefooted and booted, and sometimes spurred, careering up and down in their primitive carriages drawn by spotted horses on wheels. Scooters of strange form and many another weird contraption pass swiftly to and fro to the delight of the genial and elderly men sitting on the seats basking in the sunshine and living their youth over again in the scene before them. With some degree of truth this garden might be described as the Rotten Row of Clerkenwell."

For the pointy-headed, there's plenty more on the history of Wilmington Square at British History online.

Introducing our new frame, Wilmington. Introducing our new frame, Wilmington. Introducing our new frame, Wilmington.
02.03.2017 • Accessories

CUBITTS X BRIAN GRIMWOOD

We invited legendary illustrator Brian Grimwood to select a quadtych of bespectacled gentlemen, from the renowned to the quotidien. His choice depicts a set of individuals who have impacted his life and illustrious career.

Including portraits of Jaime Sabartés Gual, Catalan Spanish artist, poet and writer and Lytton Strachey, Bloomsbury Group founding member - as featured in the Financial times how to spend it.

Brian rose to prominence in the 1960s, when he became known for his use of fluid lines. His instantly recognisable illustrations have graced everything from magazine covers to whisky bottles and the humble postage stamp.

You can see more of his work here. 

Free cloth to all on our mailing list, redeemable in store during the month of March. 

Available for all to buy online.

All proceeds will be donated to Brian's charity of choice, Cancer Research UK.

CUBITTS X BRIAN GRIMWOOD CUBITTS X BRIAN GRIMWOOD CUBITTS X BRIAN GRIMWOOD
23.02.2017 • Cubitts , Sunglasses , Spectacles , Glasses , Spectales

Horn is Back

Our collection of handmade horn frames is growing.

We've spent six months developing our horn collection, sustainably sourcing the by-product from domesticated herds of water buffalo, bred outdoors in west Africa or on the vast Tibetan plateau.

Horn is naturally hypoallergenic and lightweight material, used in traditional spectacle making.

Each piece is hand selected, turned, shaped and polished, and is completely individual.

Available to buy in store from today in a new range of shapes, including Agar, Bidborough and Cartwright. All come in an almost limitless range of colourways, according to each unique peice of horn.

 

Horn is Back Horn is Back Horn is Back Horn is Back Horn is Back Horn is Back